Kymberly Martin

NDIS Minister assessing proposed NDIS changes

The well publicised proposed changes to the NDIS is gathering momentum with the newly appointed NDIS Minster Senator Linda Reynolds now reviewing where these suggested reforms will go. In a statement to F2L the minister said she would be closely assessing independent trial outcomes before any legislation is taken forward.

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“As the new minister for the NDIS, I am committed to understanding the concerns of the states and territories, stakeholders and most of all the participants as the NDIS was established as, and continues to be, an insurance scheme.

“Any future reforms must continue to deliver on the promise of the NDIS, which is to provide people with permanent and significant disability choice and control over a flexible support package to achieve their goals,” she said. “And this is what independent assessments are designed to do and the purpose of the trial is to understand what is working and what needs to be improved.”

According to the minister, like any large program, the NDIS needs constant attention and initial discussions with state and territory counterparts agree to having a fair and equitable scheme with consistent and simple assessment systems.

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“This is a scheme I am passionate about and which I’ve engaged with through parliamentary committees. I also have several family members who, like many Australians, have had their lives changed by the NDIS,” she said.

The government has allocated an additional $3.9 billion in the 2020-21 Budget for NDIS participant costs from 2020-21 to 2023-24, which reflects continued increases in demand for NDIS-funded services. The scheme is expected to cost $93.8 billion over the next four years.

“I look forward to engaging with the sector in coming weeks as we work together to build a fair, equitable, consistent and affordable NDIS for the future,” the minister said.

“As the new minister for the NDIS, I am committed to understanding the concerns of the states and territories, stakeholders and most of all the participants as the NDIS was established as, and continues to be, an insurance scheme.

“Any future reforms must continue to deliver on the promise of the NDIS, which is to provide people with permanent and significant disability choice and control over a flexible support package to achieve their goals,” she said. “And this is what independent assessments are designed to do and the purpose of the trial is to understand what is working and what needs to be improved.”

According to the minister, like any large program, the NDIS needs constant attention and initial discussions with state and territory counterparts agree to having a fair and equitable scheme with consistent and simple assessment systems.

“This is a scheme I am passionate about and which I’ve engaged with through parliamentary committees. I also have several family members who, like many Australians, have had their lives changed by the NDIS,” she said.

The government has allocated an additional $3.9 billion in the 2020-21 Budget for NDIS participant costs from 2020-21 to 2023-24, which reflects continued increases in demand for NDIS-funded services. The scheme is expected to cost $93.8 billion over the next four years.

“I look forward to engaging with the sector in coming weeks as we work together to build a fair, equitable, consistent and affordable NDIS for the future,” the minister said.

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